This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. Habitats include woodland edges and openings, thickets, riverbanks, vacant lots, landfills and dumps, gravelly back alleys, areas along roads and railways, fence rows, and urban waste areas. Swingle. YouTube; University Maryland. 176: 275-285. Established stands of this invasive tree can outcompete native species and change the composition and density of the surrounding vegetation, particularly in early successional habitats. Swingle, è tra le più aggressive in Italia e in Europa. L’Organizzazione Europea e Mediterranea per la Protezione delle Piante (EPPO) la include nella lista delle specie aliene invasive particolarmente temibili. University of Georgia. The spotted lanternfly is likely to establish itself where tree-of-heaven is present, as they co-occur in their native regions of Asia. Crowds out native species; damages pavement and building foundations in urban areas (. Family: Simaroubaceae. This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. It was commonly found in nurseries by 1840 and has been popular in urban plantings ever since. Cooperative Extension. A. altissima, comunemente noto come albero del paradiso o ailanto, è una delle specie invasive arboree più dannose in Europa in quanto si diffonde rapidamente e spontaneamente in tutti gli ambienti antropizzati, naturali e semi-naturali. Although this majestic tall tree is called tree-of-heaven, it is regarded as an invasive species that is capable of displacing native trees, poisoning root systems, damaging sewer lines with its roots, and producing a sap that can cause heart imflammation. Mill.) Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Ailanthus altissima forms dense, clonal thickets which displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. Er kann bis zu 25 m hoch werden. Ailanthus altissima tree-of-heaven This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in different places, and some are listed above. (Ailanthus altissima) Tree-of-heaven, also known as Chinese sumac, is a deciduous tree native to northeast and central China and Taiwan. Scientific Name: Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Division of Forestry. Australian Government. Smithsonian Institution. Cooperative Extension, which staffs local offices in all 100 counties and with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Ailanthus altissima establishes itself readily on disturbed sites, such as railroad embankments, highway medians, fencerows, and roadsides. Common names: tree-of-heaven, Chinese sumac. Forest Service. ARS. INVASIVE SPECIES IN GARRY OAK AND ASSOCIATED ECOSYSTEMS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Ailanthus altissima T R E E O F H E A V E N RANGE/KNOWN DISTRIBUTION Native to China, Tree of Heaven was introduced to North America in 1784. Tree of heaven forms dense, clonal thickets that displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. Anonymous. Wie der Essigbaum ist er zweihäusig, d.h. es gibt männliche und weibliche Pflanzen mit den entsprechenden Blüten. Swingle) was introduced intentionally for use as an ornamental plant in the 18th century. This plant is classified as invasive by the California Invasive Plant Council . Hoshovsky (Editors). Description Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. The tree rapidly spread because of an ability to grow quickly under adverse conditions. Ailante (Ailanthus altissima, Simaroubacées) L'Ailante glanduleux ( Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) ... Ailanthus altissima (P. Ailanthus grows quickly and can reach a height of 2.5 m (8 ft) in its first year. Ailanthus altissima is the only species that can grow in the temperate or cold regions. Individual Exotic Invasive Plant Fact Sheets: Glossy Buckthorn Common Buckthorn Asiatic Bittersweet Vine Winged Euonymus Multiflora Rose Japanese Barberry. National Invasive Species Information Center, Early Detection & Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) - Tree-of-Heaven, YouTube - Tree of Heaven - Invasive Plant in Maryland, Invasive Plants of California's Wildlands -, Invasive Plants of California's Wildlands, Invasive Plants of Ohio: Fact Sheet 17 - Tree-of-Heaven (PDF | 306 KB), Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council Invasive Plant Manual - Tree-of-Heaven, Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States - Tree of Heaven, Non-native Species Information: Tree-of-Heaven, Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER) -, The Quiet Invasion: A Guide to Invasive Species of the Galveston Bay Area - Tree-of-heaven, Ailanthus, copal tree, National Exotic Marine and Estuarine Species Information System (NEMESIS): Chesapeake Bay Introduced Species Database -, Weed Identification Tool - Tree of Heaven, Control and Utilization of Tree-of-Heaven: A Guide for Virginia Landowners (Mar 2019) (PDF | 6.6 MB), Publications and Reports - Invasive Species, New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets, Invasive Plants in Pennsylvania: Tree of Heaven (PDF | 256 KB), Weed Control in Natural Areas in the Western United States: Tree-of-Heaven (2013) (PDF | 223 KB), Invasive Plant Fact Sheet - Tree-of-Heaven (Nov 2011) (PDF | 213 KB), Introduced Species Summary Project - Tree of Heaven, Invasive Plants and Insects: Tree-of-Heaven, Invasive, Exotic Plants of the Southeast - Tree-of-Heaven, Ohio Perennial & Biennial Weed Guide - Tree-of-Heaven. Status in Portugal: invasive species (listed in the annex I of Decreto-Lei n° 565/99, of 21 December). Ailanthus altissima NC State University and N.C. A&T State University work in tandem, along with federal, state and local governments, to form a strategic partnership called N.C. Google. Ailanthus altissima – Biology and Ecology Research Issue. The section below contains highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source. See also: New Hampshire's Prohibited Invasive Plant Fact Sheets for additional invasive trees, shrubs, vines, and herbaceous plants Invasive Species Leaflet - Ailanthus altissima … This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. (2015): Review on invasive tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Invasive Species: Ailanthus altissima, Tree of Heaven. Ailanthus glandulosa Desf. 30 In the transliteration of the Chinese names, the spelling is adopted from the Wade System of romanization as it appeared in Mathew’s Chinese-English Dictionary, Harvard University, 1950 edition. North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. contributors include: Committee Members: Leslie Cameron, Tyler Ormsby, Marilyn Thomson, & Rachel Vecchio For More Information. Tree-of-Heaven, Ailanthus altissima. Swingle E. tree-of-heaven. Callaway, Ragan M.; Walker, Lawrence R. 1997. Invasive Species: Ailanthus altissima, Tree of Heaven. Subscribe to our website! [54325] 48. Ohio Department of Natural Resources. The MGNV website is maintained and created by the MGNV Social Media Committee with input from MGNV and VCE. The Pennsylvania Flora Project of Morris Arboretum. Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board. In naturally forested areas, A. altissima may become established in areas disturbed by storms or infestations.A. Promoting environmentally sound gardening practices for over 35 years! Division of Plant Industry. Its prolific seeding and ability to sprout from roots and stumps and grow quite rapidly just about anywhere make it a serious competitor and threat to native species and cultivated crops. In many areas it has become a noxious weed. This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. • We studied patterns of Ailanthus altissima natural regeneration in Poznań city.. A. altissima occurred mainly in the city center and near housing estates.. Its spread was limited by distance from propagule source and microhabitats. University of California. In online book: Bossard, C.C., J.M. Columbia University. Although this majestic tall tree is called tree-of-heaven, it is regarded as an invasive species that is capable of displacing native trees, poisoning root systems, damaging sewer lines with its roots, and producing a sap that can cause heart imflammation. Introducing new stock of a species considered to be a dangerous invasive alien in many parts of the world may seem foolhardy, but Ailanthus altissima var. Swingle, known as the tree of heaven, is native to China, but it can be found in some countries across Europe and North America. Noteworthy Characteristics. Plant the area with native and/or non-invasive plants to provide competition and to prevent other weeds from establishing. We explore its naturalized gene pool from 28 populations, mostly of the eastern US where infestations are especially severe. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Tree-of-Heaven. Sladonja, B., SuÅ¡ek, M. & Guillermic, J. USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Staff, Newtown Square, Penn. Ailanthus altissima NC State University and N.C. A&T State University work in tandem, along with federal, state and local governments, to form a strategic partnership called N.C. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Editors: Steven Bell, Margaret Brown, Brigitte Coulton, Kimberly Marsho, Marsha Mercer,  & Christa Watters Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council Invasive Plant Manual. Invasive tree species are relevant elements of urban landscape transformation. Mill.) Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar. Little is known about its genetic structure. Literature Cited. Trees may be referred to as male or female. Family: Simaroubaceae. Report on tree-of-heaven from the book "Weed Control in Natural Areas in the Western United States" The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely. Burbidge, F. W. 1910. By Art Gover, Jon Johnson, Kirsty Lloyd, and Jim Sellmer, 2008; revised by Art Gover, 2013 and 2019. Swingle. For More Information. Tree-of-Heaven is known as an invasive species that can rapidly spread onto disturbed sites or fragmented landscapes. (1) The species has been shown to exhibit allelopathic properties and can inhibit the germination and growth of … It is native to northeast and central China, and Taiwan. Ailanthus, also known as tree -of-heaven or Chinese sumac, is a persistent and aggressive weed throughout much of Europe and North America. It now occurs in most US states, and although primarily an urban weed, it has become a problem in forested areas especially in the eastern states. Analysis of interactions between the invasive tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and the native black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia). Its prolific seeding and ability to sprout from roots and stumps and grow quite rapidly just about anywhere make it a serious competitor and threat to native species and cultivated crops. Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) Ailanthus, also known as tree-of-heaven or Chinese sumac, is a persistent and aggressive weed throughout much of Europe and North America. Department of the Environment and Energy. Invasive Plant Species Management 5 Tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) This work was sponsored by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of State Parks (PA DCNR). Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council Invasive Plant Manual. See our Written Findings for more information about tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima). Ailanthus altissima Tree-of-Heaven To the User: Element Stewardship Abstracts (ESAs) are prepared to provide The Nature Conservancy's Stewardship staff and other land managers with current management-related information on those species and communities that are most important to protect, or most important to More images of Ailanthus altissima Life History Ailanthus, also known as tree-of-heaven or Chinese sumac, is a persistent and aggressive weed throughout much of Europe and North America. Swingle, known as tree of heaven, is native to China, but it can be found in several countries across Europe and North America. Whorled flower buds form on Giant Coneflower, an A, This week’s “mystery plant” post showed the, Master Gardener Organizations in Virginia, Teaching Garden at Fairlington Community Center, Master Gardener Tribute Garden at Fairlington Community Center, Organic Vegetable Garden at Potomac Overlook Regional Park, Educational Videos from Glencarlyn Library Community Garden, Tried & True Native Plants for the Mid-Atlantic, Planting Dates for Arlington and Alexandria, Select On-Line References for Kitchen Gardening, Gardening Basics for Arlington & Alexandria, VA, Community Gardens in Arlington & Alexandria, Between the Rows – A Guide to Vegetable Gardening, Creating Inviting Habitats for the Birds, Butterflies & Hummingbirds, Invasive Plant Factsheet: Tree of Heaven (, Virginia Cooperative Extension Publications, Virginia Cooperative Extension – Alexandria Office, Virginia Cooperative Extension – Arlington Office. Marine Invasions Research Lab. 2000. Great Britain Non-Native Species Secretariat. Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Scientific Name: Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle. Ailanthus grows quickly and can reach a height of 2.5 m (8 ft) in its first year. Ailanthus, also known as tree-of-heaven and paradise- tree, is a major nuisance to foresters, farmers, and homeowners alike. In many areas it has become a noxious weed. Ailanthus altissima Photo courtesy Joseph DiTomaso. This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. The contents of this work reflect the Common names: tree-of-heaven, Chinese sumac. With the recent announcement that Spotted Lanternfly has been confirmed in New Jersey, NJA is republishing a blog post from 2017 regarding how to properly identify the non-native and highly invasive Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima ) from native sumacs. The Asian tree was initially promoted as a host tree for silkmoth production. Penn State Extension Educator Emelie Swackhamer demonstrates how to identify the Tree of Heaven, a tree the spotted lanternfly particularly enjoys. Ailanthus, also known as tree-of-heaven or Chinese sumac, is a persistent and aggressive weed throughout much of Europe and North America. Ailanthus altissima forms dense, clonal thickets which displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. Swingle) is a short- Unlike other members of the genus Ailanthus, it is found in temperate climates rather than the tropics. Ailanthus altissima forms dense, clonal thickets which displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. Although it has had a long residence time in South Africa, it is yet to replicate the extent of invasiveness and major impacts reported for the species in other parts of its adventive range. Post was not sent - check your email addresses! … tanakae has been collected several times in recent years. Mimosa or Albizia julibrissin was introduced into the United States as an … An Ailanthus altissima in Sanger is registered as a California Big Tree. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Galveston Bay Estuary Program; Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC). Maps can be downloaded and shared. : 'foul smelling tree'), is a deciduous tree in the family Simaroubaceae. Known by a number of names including stinking sumac, Chinese sumac, varnish tree and stink tree, the plant releases a strong, offensive smell, particularly from its flowers. It measures 88 feet high, with a trunk circumference of 195 inches and a crown spread of 80 feet. North Carolina State University. Bark. Globally, invasions by alien plants are rapidly increasing in extent and severity, leading to large-scale ecosystem degradation. Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Plant the area with native and/or non-invasive plants to provide competition and to prevent other weeds from establishing. Ailanthus glandulosa Desf. Just enter your email address below and click "sign me up" to get notified of new updates to our site via email. Forest Service. Tree of large bipinnate leaves, reddish on the extremities when young, deciduous and with a fetid smell when cut.. Scientific name: Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) The tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is a rapidly growing deciduous tree native to China that has become a widespread invasive species across North America. This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. Tra le specie esotiche invasive più presenti e dannose l’ailanto, Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Common names: tree-of-heaven; Chinese sumac; paradise-tree; copal-tree Ailanthus altissima (tree-of-heaven) is a tree (family Simaroubaceae) that is widely but discontinuously distributed in California. Risk Assessment score: (in development) Ailanthus altissima (tree of heaven) is a shade-intolerant, fast-growing, nonnative tree that invades many plant community types, including forests, nationwide. Tree of heaven forms dense, clonal thickets that displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. The tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), also known as Chinese sumac, copal-tree, stink tree, and varnish tree, is a problematic exotic invasive species in Iowa.It is often confused with sumac; however, the tree of heaven can be distinguished by the foul odor it emits. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. Center for Environmental Research and Conservation. See our Written Findings for more information about tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima). Ailanthus altissima, el ailanto, árbol del cielo, árbol de los dioses, malhuele o falso zumaque, es un árbol ornamental muy utilizado en jardines públicos en el sur de Europa, originario de China.De crecimiento rápido, es muy resistente a la contaminación. ... Ailanthus altissima (P. Ailanthus altissima, commonly called tree of heaven, is native to China and was introduced into New York City in 1820 as a street tree and food source for silkworm caterpillars.It has now naturalized throughout much of the United States. GRIN-Global. 2006. Home and Garden Information Center. Cooperative Extension, which staffs local offices in all 100 counties and with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is an invasive plant that grows in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through 8. The tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is a rapidly growing deciduous tree native to China that has become a widespread invasive species across North America. Ohio State University. Native to China. However, the means and temporal progression of spread from this and other early points of introduction are not clear. Ailanthus altissima is an invasive tree from Asia. Cooperative Extension. More images of Ailanthus altissima Life History Ailanthus, also known as tree-of-heaven or Chinese sumac, is a persistent and aggressive weed throughout much of Europe and North America. This rapidly-growing tree has now overwhelmed natural areas in over 30 states and is reported as invasive in both Arlington and Alexandria as well as in many national parks in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC. Ailanthus altissima forms dense, clonal thickets which displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. Description Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Ailanthus, also known as tree-of-heaven or Chinese sumac, is a persistent and aggressive weed throughout much of Europe and North America. Swingle) is a short-lived,… 1784 by William Hamilton at his Philadelphia, PA estate. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants. Heisey, R. M. Allelopathic and herbicidal effects of extracts from tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima). Swingle Quassia Family (Simaroubaceae) DESCRIPTION Tree-of-heaven, also known as ailanthus, Chinese sumac, and stinking sumac, is a rapidly growing, deciduous tree in the mostly tropical Quassia Family. American Journal of Botany 77(5):662-670; 1988. Ailanthus grows quickly and can reach a height of 2.5 m (8 ft) in its first year; ultimately these trees are 25-30 m (80-100 ft). Tree of large bipinnate leaves, reddish on the extremities when young, deciduous and with a fetid smell when cut.. Scientific name: Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Synonyms: A. glandulosa Desf. Also known as Chinese or Stinking Sumac, this plant was introduced from China in 1784 as a specimen and shade tree. Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) This tree is invasive and it is undoubtedly still spreading into new areas. Known by a number of names including stinking sumac, Chinese sumac, varnish tree and stink tree, the plant releases a strong, offensive smell, particularly from its flowers. Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) This is a fast-growing tree that typically grows into a large tree between 45 and 60 feet tall with a … This tree is invasive and it is undoubtedly still spreading into new areas. Randall, and M.C. Swingle. Competition and facilitation: a synthetic approach to interactions in plant communities. Swingle) conflicting values: assessment of its ecosystem services and potential biological threat. Ailanthus, also known as tree -of-heaven or Chinese sumac, is a persistent and aggressive weed throughout much of Europe and North America. Its rating is moderate. Common Name: Tree-of-Heaven. Weed of the Week. In addition to writers & photographers credited through bylines (Mary Free, Judy Funderburk, Elaine Mills, Christa Watters & Susan Wilhelm), Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. One of the most widespread invasive alien plant species in Europe and North America, Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Journal of Chemical Ecology 16: in press; 1990. Ailanthus altissima tree-of-heaven This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in different places, and some are listed above. altissima has the ability to grow in poor soils and under stressful environmental conditions. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food. Tree of heaven produces many seeds, grows extremely quickly, and can out-compete native plants. Ailanthus altissima /eɪˈlænθəs ælˈtɪsɪmə/, commonly known as tree of heaven, ailanthus, varnish tree, or in Chinese as chouchun (Chinese: 臭椿; pinyin: chòuchūn; lit. Tolerant of pollution, it became a popular street tree in the 19th century. This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. The .gov means it’s official.Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. This invasive tree species is extremely tolerant of poor soil conditions and can even grow in cement cracks. Size: Tree-of-heaven has rapid growth and can grow into a very large tree, reaching heights of 80 to 100 feet and up to 6 feet in diameter.Bark: The bark of tree-of-heaven is smooth and green when young, eventually turning light brown to gray, resembling the skin of a cantaloupe. Tree-of-Heaven is known as an invasive species that can rapidly spread onto disturbed sites or fragmented landscapes. Swingle E. tree-of-heaven. It was first introduced to North America in 1784 in Philadelphia, and became a popular ornamental tree commonly found in nurseries by the 1840s. E’ inserita da Agosto 2019 nella lista delle specie invasive di interesse unionale. Ailanthus altissima: tree of heaven ... cherry, lilac, maple, poplar, stone fruits, and the non-native invasive tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima), which it appears to prefer. Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) While shade-intolerant, A. altissima can survive as a slow-growing seedling or sprout until light conditions improve. Ailanthus, also known as tree-of-heaven and paradise- tree, is a major nuisance to foresters, farmers, and homeowners alike. 2020 Invasive Plant Factsheet: Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) This rapidly-growing tree has now overwhelmed natural areas in over 30 states and is reported as invasive in both Arlington and Alexandria as well as in many national parks in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC. This species now occurs in >40 US states, primarily as an urban and roadside weed. Report on tree-of-heaven from the book "Weed Control in Natural Areas in the Western United States" All parts of the tree, especially … It belongs to the Simaroubaceae (Quassia) family, which is primarily tropical or subtropical. It belongs to the Simaroubaceae (Quassia) family, which is primarily tropical or subtropical. The tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), also known as Chinese sumac, copal-tree, stink tree, and varnish tree, is a problematic exotic invasive species in Iowa.It is often confused with sumac; however, the tree of heaven can be distinguished by the foul odor it emits. Tree-of-heaven also helps the invasive spotted lanternfly (which threatens fruit crops and more) by allowing it to complete its life cycle. Tree of heaven produces many seeds, grows extremely quickly, and can out-compete native plants. Heisey, R. M. Evidence for allelopathy by tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima). With the recent announcement that Spotted Lanternfly has been confirmed in New Jersey, NJA is republishing a blog post from 2017 regarding how to properly identify the non-native and highly invasive Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima ) from native sumacs. National Genetic Resources Program. Provides state, county, point and GIS data. Ailanthus altissima is a widespread invasive species in many parts of the world. Common Name: Tree-of-Heaven. What does tree-of-heaven look like? Noteworthy Characteristics. Photo: Dave JacksonLeaves: Tree-of-heaven leaves are pinnately compound, meaning they have a central stem in which leaflets are attached on each side. Swingle de la famille des Simaroubacées) est un arbre à croissance très rapide originaire de Chine mais naturalisé en Europe depuis fort longtemps. University of Pennsylvania. Ailanthus altissima forms dense, clonal thickets which displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. Ailanthus altissima, commonly called tree of heaven, is native to China and was introduced into New York City in 1820 as a street tree and food source for silkworm caterpillars.It has now naturalized throughout much of the United States. Risk Assessment score: (in development) Ailanthus altissima (Tree of Heaven), an invasive tree species native to China and East Asia, was first introduced into the US ca. Status in Portugal: invasive species (listed in the annex I of Decreto-Lei n° 565/99, of 21 December). Mimosa or Silk Tree. Ailanthus altissima forms dense, clonal thickets which displace native species and can rapidly invade fields, meadows, and harvested forests. Plant Ecology. Tree-of-heaven (TOH) or Ailanthus altissima was introduced into the U.S. by a gardener in Philadelphia in 1784. Pennsylvania State University. USDA. Graphics: Marilyn Thomson Habitats include woodland edges and openings, thickets, riverbanks, vacant lots, landfills and dumps, gravelly back alleys, areas along roads and railways, fence rows, and urban waste areas. Webmaster: Elena Rodriguez. Invasive Neophyten Götterbaum (Ailanthus altissima) Götterbaum (Ailanthus altissima) Aufgeführt in Schwarzer Liste Beschreibung: Der Götterbaum stammt ursprünglich aus Ostasien. Weed Research and Information Center.
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